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Type Ia Supernova, 450-Year-Old Supernova, Continue To Bloom

Over 400 years ago, Johannes Kepler and many others witnessed the appearance of a new "star" in the sky. Today, this object is known as the Kepler supernova remnant.  Previously, astronomers have deduced that the Kepler remnant comes from a so-called Type Ia supernova, which is the result of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf.  New data from Chandra suggest that this white dwarf exploded after pulling material from a companion red giant star, and not from the merger with another white dwarf.  In this image, data from Chandra are colored red, green, and blue to show low, medium, and high-energy X-rays that have been combined with an optical image of the field.

In 1572, a white dwarf star exploded and shone brightly in the sky. Astronomers such as Tycho Brahe monitored the event because it was visible to the naked eye even though they did not have the modern sophisticated equipment. The supernova was named after Tycho and since we missed to see it 450 years ago, the Chandra X-ray observatory’s data was able to show how it has incredibly boomed since then. There is a video which was made by a group of astronomers that shows a compilation of Chandra’s observations (2000 to 2015) of the ongoing expansion of the Tycho’s supernova.

Over 400 years ago, Johannes Kepler and many others witnessed the appearance of a new "star" in the sky. Today, this object is known as the Kepler supernova remnant. Previously, astronomers have deduced that the Kepler remnant comes from a so-called Type Ia supernova, which is the result of a thermonuclear explosion of a white dwarf. New data from Chandra suggest that this white dwarf exploded after pulling material from a companion red giant star, and not from the merger with another white dwarf. In this image, data from Chandra are colored red, green, and blue to show low, medium, and high-energy X-rays that have been combined with an optical image of the field.

The video brings out an image of a puffy structure, taken from 10,000 light years away. As observed from the earth’s point of view the image is still growing. The group of astronomers noticed that the left side of the structure grows slowly which is two times slower than the growth of the circle’s lower-right and rightmost parts.  The team believes that the difference in growth is caused by the gas density that envelopes the remnant. Apart from the film, the astronomers also published their findings that have more details about the Tycho’s supernova.

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